Warning: session_start(): open(/var/lib/php/session/sess_7b31b5881e9447308eb92d161f90e8ac, O_RDWR) failed: No space left on device (28) in /var/www/vhosts/foad-spirit.net/httpdocs/bandeau-boite-quiz.php on line 2 Warning: session_start(): Failed to read session data: files (path: /var/lib/php/session) in /var/www/vhosts/foad-spirit.net/httpdocs/bandeau-boite-quiz.php on line 2

Basic French : conjugation and grammar ? (apprendre le français pour les anglophones)
C2RvbTNN0Qw
ZS-PholfM5A
CbxrZMePugU
sA82J16mNfU
qHuqYEwVKjc
gXTlC-q16yQ
uWXGZP20VIA
_6s8dqT6nB0
5FbODfvUOd8
QNTf1KWGkDA
tw7othLUDEM
6gN4rlzxM0A
TdHBM-h9r7E
FwZDDe7ptBQ
F0y2udVJLSw
054MD3i3RDE
xAiWQxdJwfk
YwL588a5-8s
9DMEizcwpq4
cH99IjTBoeM
-4FBTBhQTME
qHphXuupKq4
XP-t4Lr820w
gYZZR3S7sZw
ptVBVxYvny0
2vAc-__6W3E
H96cTMHVaiI
JGutd-Qrkwo
UeZDgGaLTWI
Tc78yPv_ztM
Conclusion
Conjugation
Grammar
Introduction
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35

 

drapeau français

Basic French : conjugation and grammar ?

Accès vidéos éducatives

 

 

Move your mouse over the text to learn more
or click on the blue button to show videos...

Word stress, rhythm, intonation

Word stress
Syllabes in French words are, for the most part, equally stressed. English speakers tend to stress the first syllable, which is definitely unusual in French, so dry adding a light stress on the final syllable to compensate.

Rhythm
The rhythm of a French sentence is based on breaking the phrase into meaningful section, then stressing the final syllable pronounced in each section. The stress at these points is characterised by a slight rise in intonation.

French pronunciation, unlike that of English, is quite easy. The « beat » of the sentence is quite regular because of these stressed syllabes.

Intonation
A rising intonation in french is used when asking a question. There is also a rise in intonation when listing items : your voice goes up after each item until you say the final in the list, at which point your voice falls.

Liaison

French consonants at the en of a word are only pronounced when the following word begins with a vowel or a silent « h ».

This « running-on » of a sound is calling « liaison » :

  • When spoken, the sentence « Il est artiste » (He is an artist) sounds like « eelay tarteest ».

« s » or « x » sounds like « z » :

  • « Vous avez (you have) is pronounced « voozavay » ;
  • « Les yeux » (the eyes) is pronounced « layzyer ».

« d » sounds like « t » :

  • « Grand animal » (big animal) is pronounced « grontanymull ».

Qualitative adjectives

In french, a qualitative adjective always takes the gender and number on the noun it describes (basically following the rules that apply to nouns), and usage, meaning or sound usually determine whether it goes before or after the noun :

  • Un grand homme (a great man) ;
  • Des hommes grands (tall men)

La belle fille (the beautiful girl) ;

  • Les robes rouges (the red dresses)

Pronouns

Personal pronouns are further divided as :

  • Subject pronouns
  • Object pronouns
  • Reflexive pronouns  (direct and indirect)
  • Possessive pronouns

Adverbs

The general rule is to add « -ment » (which corresponds to the English adverb ending « -ly ») to the feminine form of the adjective :

  • happy (heureux/heureuse) ; happily (heureusement)

As usual , there are some exceptions :

  • nice (gentil/gentille) ; nicely (gentiment)
  • brief (bref/brève) ; briefly (brièvement)

If an adjective ends with a vowel, use the masculine form plus « -ment » :

  • real ; true (vrai/vraie) ; really;truly (vraiment)

If an adjective ends with « -ant » or « -ent », change it to « -amment » or « -emment » respectively :

  • constant (constant) ; constantly (constamment)
  • prudent (prudent) ; prudently (prudemment).

Articles

Articles are further divided as :

  • Definite articles : le, la les
  • Indefinite articles : un, une, des
  • Partitive article : du, de la

Word order : sentence

The word order in French is subject-verb-object :

  • I eat the cake (Je mange le gâteau) : « Je » (subject), « mange » (verb), « le gâteau » (object)
  • When the object « le gâteau » is turned into a pronoun, however, the word order becomes subject-object-verb :
    • I eat it (Je le mange) : « Je » (subject), « le » (object), « mange » (verb)

The interrogative form

There are three ways of asking a question in French :

  1. The most common way is to use the intonation of your voice :
    • You have a car (Tu as une voiture)
    • Do you have a car ? (Tu as une voiture?)
  2. Use Est-ce que... (literally, « is it that... ? ») at the begenning of a sentence :
    • Do you have a car ? (Est-ce que tu as une voiture?)
  3. Invert the subject and the verb and link them with a hyphen :
    • Do you have a car ? (As-tu une voiture?)

When the question is in the affirmative and you want to answer « yes », say « Oui ». But when the question is in the negative and you want to answer « yes », say « Si ».

  • Don't you have a car ? (Tu n'as pas de voiture?)
  • Yes I do (Si).

Negative form

To form the negative in a sentence, place « ne... pas » around the verb. In the case of a compound tense place them around the auxiliary verb.

  • She doesn't play (Elle ne joue pas) ; I didn't see the lions (Je n'ai pas vu les lions)

Others negatives : « plus », « jamais », « guère »

  • I don't smile anymore (Je ne souris plus) ; She never sleeps (Elle ne dort jamais) ; He hardly plays (il ne joue guère)
  • « Pas », used alone, corresponds to the English word « not » and is used when there is no verb :
    • Not yet (pas encore) ; Not bad (pas mal) ; Not me (pas moi)

The passive form

Just like English, the passive form is obtained by using the declined auxiliary « être » (to be) followed by the past participle of the action verb.

  • Je suis bien servi (I am well served)
  • La voiture était conduite par un homme (the car was driven by a man)
  • Vous serez partis avant midi (You'll be gone before noon).

Gender

Unlike in English, French nouns are either masculine or feminine, but there are unfortunately no hard and fast rules, other than usage, to help you distinguish between the two except where they clearly depend on gender :

  • Le père (the father) ;
  • La mère (the mother)

Nonetheless, you may find it useful to know that many feminine nouns naturally end in « e » or are formed by adding an « e » to their masculine counterpart (although corollary transformations are also sometimes requiered, such as doubling the final consonant or modifying the final vowel) :

  • Le voisin – la voisine (the male / female neighbour)
  • Le chien – la chienne (the male / female dog)
  • Le fermier – la fermière (the male / female farmer)

Plural

As a general rule, most nouns can be made plural simply by adding an « s » (sometimes an « x ») to their singular form (pronunciation remains the same, however, the sole indicator of their number in spoken language is the article used in front of them).

  • Un ami – des amis (a friend – friends) ; Un hôtel – des hôtels (a hotel – hotels)
  • un feu – des feux (a fire – fires) ; un bateau – des bateaux (a boat – boats)

Notable exceptions are some words ending in « al » or « ail » whose plurals end in « aux » (which does change their pronunciation).

  • Un cheval – des chevaux (a horse – horses) ; Un canal – des canaux (a channel – channels)
  • Le corail – des coraux (the coral – the corals) : Le bail – les baux (the lease – the leases)

Finally, certains words remain unchanged when pluralized :

  • Une souris – des souris (a mouse – mice) ; Une croix – des croix (a cross – crosses).

The auxiliaries

The two main French auxiliaries are « avoir » (to have) and « être » (to be), of which « voir » is the most common. They can be used alone or in conjunction with other verbs to form various compound tenses.

For examples with « Avoir » (to have):

  • I HAVE a good memory (j'AI une bonne mémoire)
  • You HAVE a very big car (tu AS une très grosse voiture)
  • Clara HAS a boyfriend (Clara A un petit ami)
  • For examples with «Etre» (to be) :
  • My name IS Lilou (Mon nom EST Lilou)
  • Where IS kevina ? (où EST Kevin?)
  • I AM fine (Je SUIS bien)
  • Are you sure? (ES-tu sûr?)
  • We ARE pressed for time (nous SOMMES pressés)

Verbs

In french, the present tense of the indicative mode (as opposed to the conditional, the subjunctive or the imperative) only has a simple form, whereas the past and the future tenses each have a simple as well as compound forms.

Their various representations mostly derive from the infinitive, and some of them require the use of an auxiliary. Infinitive verbs have four possible endings : « er », « ir », « oir » an « re », and their present participles, or gerundives (which don't require the use of any auxiliary), all end in « ant ».

  • First group with Infinitive verbs in « -er » are regular, except « aller » : parler, manger,...
  • Second group with infinitive verbs in « -ir » and present participle in « -issant »,  are regular : finir (finissant)
  • Third group with infinitive verbs in « -re », « -oir » or « -ir » are irregular : prendre, voir, partir...
  • As for declined endings, they are vary according to tense, person, radical and number : je chante, tu chantes, … nous chantons...

Present tense

The French present tense, called le présent or le présent de l'indicatif , is quite similar in usage to the English present tense. In French, the present tense is used to express all of the following :

  1. Current actions and situations
    • Nous allons au marché (We are going to the market)
  2. Habitual actions
    • Il va à l'école tous les jours (He goes to school every day)
    • Je visite des musées le samedi ( I visit museums on Saturdays )
  3. Absolute and general truths
    • La terre est ronde (The earth is round)
    • L'éducation est importante (Education is important)
  4. Actions which will occur immediately
    • J'arrive ! (I'll be right there!)
    • Il part tout de suite (He is leaving right away).

The progressive form

To express (and emphasise) the present continuous, expressions such as 'en train de' or 'en cours de' may be used.

  • « Jean est en train de manger », may be translated as « John is eating », « John is in the middle of eating ».
  • « On est en train de chercher un nouvel appartement » may be translated as « We are looking for a new apartment », « we are in the process of finding a new apartment ».

Past tense

One of the most striking differences between French and English is in verb tenses. Learning how to use the various past tenses can be very tricky, because English has several tenses which either do not exist in or do not translate literally into French - and vice versa.

During the first year of French study, every student becomes aware of the troublesome relationship between the two main past tenses.

The imperfect [je mangeais] translates to the English imperfect [I was eating] while the « passé composé » [j'ai mangé] literally translates to the English present perfect [I have eaten] but can also be translated as the English simple past [I ate] or the emphatic past [I did eat].

It is extremely important to understand the distinctions between the « passé composé » and « imparfait » in order to use them correctly and thus express past events accurately. Before you can compare them, however, be sure that you understand each tense individually...

Futur tense

Future tense endings are added directly to the infinitive.

  • With «chanter» (to sing) :
    • Je chanter(ai) ; tu chanter(as) ; il/elle/on chanter(a) ; nous chanter(ons) ; vous chanter(ez) ; Ils/elles chanter(ont)
  • With « finir » (to finish) :
    • Je finir(ai) ; tu finir(as) ; il/elle/on finir(a) ; nous finir(ons) ; vous finir(ez) ; Ils/elles finir(ont)
  • But « -re » verbs drop the final « e » before adding the endings.
    • With « prendre » (to take) :
      • Je prendr(ai) ; tu prendr(as) ; il/elle/on prendr(a) ; nous prendr(ons) ; vous prendr(ez) ; Ils/elles prendr(ont)
      • For example, with « prendre » (to take) : je prendrai l'argent (I will take the money).

Near futur (futur proche)

The simpliest way of expressing the future tense is to use the present tense of « aller » (« to go ») plus an infinitive. We use this in English too so you won't have any trouble remembering.

Firstly, you should learn the present tense of « aller » as it is irregular :

  • je vais (I go)
  • tu vas (you go)
  • il/elle/on va (he/she/it goes)
  • nous allons (we go)
  • vous allez (you go)
  • ils/elles vont (they go)

For example : Aller + infinitive

  • The present tense of «ALLER» + MANGER : je VAIS MANGER une pomme (I am going to eat an apple )
  • The present tense of «ALLER» + ACHETER : Elle VA ACHETER six stylos (She is going to buy six pens).

Imperative (Commands)

To give an order in French, just use the present tense of the verb without the subject. Commands exist only in the « tu », « vous » and « nous » forms.

With « -er », drop the final « s » of the « tu » ending :

  • Eat ! (Mange! : singular and informal)
  • Go ! (Allez ! : plural and formal)
  • Let's sing ! (Chantons)

To make a command negative, just put « ne... pas » around it :

  • Don't speak ! (Ne parlez pas!)

The verb « être » has very irregular form in the imperative :

  • Let's be nice ! (Soyons gentils!)
  • Don't be so angry ! (Ne sois pas si fâché!)

Additional

French alphabet

Learn the phonetic pronunciation of the French alphabet. Learn these in the order given. The suggested sounds are :

  • A (ahh), B (bay), C (say), D (day), E (euh), F (f),G (jhay) ,\n. H (ahsh), I (ee), J (jhee), K (kahh), L (ehll), M (ehmm), N (ehnn),\n. O (ohh), P (pay), Q (koo), R (airr(rolled r)), S (es), T (tay), U (ooh),\n. V (vay), W (doo-bluh-vay), X (eex), Y (ee-grek), Z (zed).
  • The unaccented French « e » is pronounced similarly to the « e » in the English word « the », but slightly shorter and further back in the throat.
  • The French letters « g » and « j » are pronounced with a soft « jhay » sound similar to the « s » in Asia. The vowel sounds in the French letters are switched—« g being jhay », and « j being jhee ».
  • In French, the « r », either rolled or guttural. When audible at the end of a word, it always seems to be followed, however faintly, by the sound « E », as is the case with all other final consonants.

Most qualitative adjectives

Most qualitative adjectives can have three forms :

  1. The generic, or positive form : beau / belle (beautiful)
  2. The comparative form, which serves to indicate varying degrees of quality :
    • MOINS beau/belle QUE (LESS beautiful THAN)
    • AUSSI beau/belle QUE (AS beautiful AS)
    • PLUS beau/belle QUE (MORE beautiful THAN)
  3. The superlative form, which serves to indicate the utmost degree (good or bad) of a quality :
    • LE PLUS beau, LA PLUS belle (THE MOST beautiful)
    • LE MOINS beau, LA MOINS belle (THE LEAST beautiful)
  • Or to emphasize the strength of a quality :
    • Très mauvais / mauvaise (very bad)
    • Très bon / bonne (very good)
Adjective endings in french

Adjective endings

Object pronouns

  • me (« moi »)
  • You (« toi ») or (« vous »)
  • him, her, it (« lui » : masculine - singular, « elle » : feminine - singular)
  • us (« nous »)
  • You (« vous »)
  • Them (« eux » : masculine - plural, « elles » : feminine – plural)

Possessive pronouns

Possessive pronouns, which take the gender and number of the « possession », have different forms depending on whether there is one « possessor » or more.

  • MINE
    • One possession : « le mien » (masculine – singular) ; « la mienne » (feminine – singular)
    • Several possessions : « les miens » (masculine – plural) ; « les miennes » (feminine – plural)
  • YOURS
    • One possession : « le tien » (masculine – singular) ; « la tienne » (feminine – singular)
    • Several possessions : « les tiens» (masculine – plural) ; « les tiennes » (feminine – plural)
  • HIS/HERS/ITS
    • One possession : « le sien » (masculine – singular) ; « la sienne » (feminine – singular)
    • Several possessions : « les siens» (masculine – plural) ; « les siennes » (feminine – plural)

Reflexive pronouns (direct and indirect)

  • me/myself (« me »)
  • You/yourself (« te ») or (« vous »)
  • him/himself, her/herself, it/itself (« le/lui » : masculine - singular, « la » : feminine - singular)
  • us/ourselves (« nous »)
  • You/yourselves (« vous »)
  • Them/themselves (« eux » : masculine - plural, « elles » : feminine – plural)

In French, « tu », « toi » and « te » are only to be used when addressing a close friend, an animate member or a child. In all other dealing, is is to be replaced by « vous » (2nd peron, plural), considered more polite and respectful.

Subject pronouns

  • I (« Je »)
  • You (« tu ») or (« vous »)
  • he, she, it (« il »: masculine - singular, « elle » : feminine - singular)
  • we (« nous »)
  • You (« vous »)
  • They (« ils » : masculine - plural, « elles » : feminine – plural)

Irregular adverbs

There are a few common irregular adverbs that must be learned :

  • good (bon) ; well (bien)
  • bad (mauvais) ; badly (mal)
  • better (meilleur) ; best (mieux).

Definite articles

Whereas there is only one definite article « the » in English, there are three in French, to be used according to the gender and number of the names they are associated with : « le » (masculine – singular), « la » (feminine – singular), and « les » (masculine/feminine – plural) : Le livre (the book) ; la voiture (the car) ; les voitures (the cars).

NOTE THAT « le » and « la » become « l' » in front of words starting with a vowel or a mute « h » : L'aéroport (the airport) ; L'exposition (the exposition) ; L'hiver (the winter)

ALSO NOTE THAT « le » and « les » respectively become « au » and « aux » when they follow the preposition « a » : Allons au (à le) festival) (Let's go to the festival) ; Service aux (à les) tables (table service)

AND BECOM « du » and « des » when they follow the preposition « de » : Le capitaine du (de le) bateau (the ship's captain) ; L'horaire des (de les) trains (the train schedule).

Indefinite articles

Concurrently, there are three indefinite articles, also to be used according to the gender and number of the names they are associated with :

  • « un » (masculine – singular) : Un garçon (a boy)
  • « une » (feminine – singular) : Une fille (a girl)
  • and « des » (masculine/feminine – plural) : des heures (hours)

Note that, unlike in English, the indefinite article is required in front of a plural noun.

Partitive articles

French also two partitive articles to distinguish the part from the whole, or things that cannot be counted : «du» (masculine – singular), «de la» (feminine – singular) :

  • Du pain (some bread)
  • de la sauce (some sauce)

Question words

  • Who ? (Qui ?)
    • Who is it ? (Qui est-ce?)/(C'est qui ?)
  • What ? (Quoi ?)
    • What is it ? (Qu'est-ce que c'est ?)/(C'est quoi ?)
  • Which? (Quel/Quelle ?)
    • Whish boy is it ? (Quel garçon est-ce ?)/(C'est quel garçon ?)
  • Where ? (Où?)
    • Where is she going ? (Où va-t-elle?)/(Où est-ce qu'elle va?)
  • When ? (Quand?)
    • When are you leaving ? (Quand pars-tu?)/(Tu pars quand ?)/(Quand (est-ce que) tu pars ?)
  • How ? (Comment?)
    • How is he going ? (Comment va-t-il?)/(Il va comment?)/(Comment (est-ce qu')il va?)

As for exceptions, they are numerous...

For example :

the feminine of nouns ending in « eau » ends in « elle » :

  • Le jumeau – la jumelle (the male / female twin).

The feminine of nouns ending in « f » ends in « ve » :

  • Le veuf – la veuve (the windower – the window)

The feminine of most nouns ending « x » ends in « se » :

  • L'époux - l'épouse (the husband – the wife)

As for exceptions, they are numerous...

For example :

The feminine of nouns ending in « teur » ends either in « teuse » or « trice » :

  • Le menteur – la menteuse (the male / female liar)
  • L'éditeur – l'éditrice (the male / female publisher)

The feminine of most other nouns ending in « eur » ends in « euse » :

  • Le danseur – la danseuse (the male / female dancer)

And the feminine of many other nouns in completely different :

  • Le garçon – la fille (the boy – the girl)
  • Un homme – une femme (a man – a woman)
  • Le frère – la sœur (the brother – the sister)

Plural : unpredicable rules

While others follow unpredicable rules :

  • Un œil – des yeux (an eyes – eyes) ;
  • Le ciel – les cieux (the sky – the skies).
Avoir (to have) in french

Avoir (To have)

être (to be) in french

être (To be)

The present tense in french

The present tense

Trick : the present tense in french

TRICK : The present tense

Imperfect tense (Imparfait)

The most usual simple form of the past tense is the imperfect which indicates an habitual or ongoing action in the past.

For example :

  • Je MANGEAIS souvent une pomme le matin (I often ATE an apple in the morning).
  • C'est arrivé pendant que vous DORMIEZ (It happened while you WERE SLEEPING).
imperfect tense in french

Conjugation : Imperfect tense (Imparfait)

Perfect tense (compound form)

The most usual compound form is the « perfect tense », which indicates an action completed in the past.

It is obtained by using a declined auxiliary (« to have » or « to be ») follow by the past participle of the action verb (which varies depending on the infinitive ending but remains unchanged throug all persons).

For example :

  • Je suis allé à l'aéroport (I went to the airport).
  • Tu as pris l'avion (You took the plane).
  • Il est parti (He left).
  • Nous avons fini par arriver (We finally arrived).
Perfect tense in french

Conjugation : Perfect tense (compound form)

The futur in french

Conjugation : the futur

Prepositions

  • Of/from (de) : from the country (de la campagne)
  • to/at (à) : to/at a concert (à un concert)
  • When used with the definite article in the masculine and in the plural, prepositions change their form :
    • to/in Japan : au (à + le) Japon
    • from Japan : du (de + le) Japon
    • to/at the children : aux (à + les) enfants
    • of/from the children : des (de + les) enfants

Other useful prepositions

  • with (avec)
  • without (sans)
  • at the place of/at (chez)
  • in (dans/en)
  • behind (derrière)
  • in front of (devant)
  • between (entre)
  • for (pour)
  • under (sous)
  • on (sur)
  • towards (vers)

Ordinal number

  1. first = premier
  2. second = deuxième
  3. third = troisième
  4. fourth = quatrième
  5. fifth = cinquième
  6. sixth = sixième
  7. seventh = septième
  8. eighth = huitième
  9. ninth = neuvième
  10. tenth = dixième

Questions

  • Could you repeat that, please ? : Pouvez-vous répéter, s'il vous plaît ? (pronunciation : [poovay voo Raypaytay, seel voo ple ?])
  • Do you speak French ? : Parlez-vous français ? (pronunciation : [paRlay voo fRañse ?])
  • What does the word... mean ? : Que veut dire le mot … ? (pronunciation : [kE v œ deeR lE mo... ?])
  • Do you understand ? : vous comprenez ? (pronunciation : [voo konpREnay ?])
  • Is there a... ? : Est-ce qu'il y a... (pronunciation : [es keel ya... ?])
  • Could I have... ? : Puis-je avoir ? (pronunciation : [pUeezh avwaR... ?])

Words and expressions

  • Here : Ici (pronunciation : [eesee])
  • there : Là (pronunciation : [la])
  • right : à droite (pronunciation : [a dRwat])
  • Straight ahead : Tout droit (pronunciation : [too dRwa])
  • With : Avec (pronunciation : [avek])\n. Without : Sans (pronunciation : [sañ]), [añ] pronounced as in  « lawn » without articulate the « n »
  • a lot : Beaucoup (pronunciation : [bokoo])
  • a little : Peu (pronunciation : [pœ]), [œ] always pronounced as in « pUrse »
  • also : aussi , (pronunciation : [osee])
  • On  : sur, (pronunciation : [sUR])
  • When : quand, (pronunciation : [kañ])
  • Above : en haut, (pronunciation : [añ o])
  • Below : en bas, (pronunciation : [añ ba])

Questions

  • How are you ? : Comment allez-vous ? (pronunciation : [kømañ talay voo ?])
  • Fine, and you ? : Très bien et vous ? (pronunciation : [tRe byeñ, ay voo?])
  • Where is the … ? : Où se trouve le... ? (pronunciation : [oo sE tRoov... ?])
  • Where is the hotel...? : Où se trouve l'hôtel... ? (pronunciation : [oo sE tRoov lotel... ?])
  • Is it far from here ? : Est-ce loin d'ici ? (pronunciation : [es lweñ deesee ?])
  • Is it close to here ? : Est-ce près d'ici ? (pronunciation : [es pRe deesee ?])
  • Could you speak more slowly, please ? : Pouvez-vous parler plus lentement, s'il vous plaît ? (pronunciation : [poovay voo paRlay plU lañtmañ, seel voo ple ?])

Conjunctions

Conjunctions link things in a sentence. These things could be nouns, phrases or clauses.

  • and (et)
  • as (comme)
  • because (parce que)
  • but (mais)
  • however (pourtant ; cependant)
  • or (ou)
  • since (depuis ; depuis que)
  • so (donc)
  • when (quand ; lorsque)
  • while ( pendant que)
  • without (sans ; sans que)
Vidéo éducative

 

 

 

Funny song
Frog Invaders - Excuse My French

2 minutes and 59 seconds, that's all !
Vidéo éducative

 

 

 

Tips on Learning French...

Some thoughts about the French language and how to learn it.

14 minutes and 43 seconds, that's all...
Vidéo éducative

 

 

 

Verb to be (verbe être) : present tense.

5 minutes and 38 seconds, that's all !
Vidéo éducative

 

 

 

Verb to have (verbe avoir) : present tense.

4 minutes and 25 seconds, that's all !
Vidéo éducative

 

 

 

French Present Tense : le présent.

7 minutes and 45 seconds, that's all !
Vidéo éducative

 

 

 

Learn French Compound Past Tense : Le Passé Composé

10 minutes and 40 seconds, that's all !
Vidéo éducative

 

 

 

Past Participle Agreement in French

9 minutes and 14 seconds, that's all !
Vidéo éducative

 

 

 

Imperfect Tense in French : l'imparfait.

5 minutes and 13 seconds, that's all !
Vidéo éducative

 

 

 

The French Future Tense

5 minutes and 40 seconds, that's all !
Vidéo éducative

 

 

 

The Near Future : Le futur proche.

2 minutes and 21 seconds, that's all !
Vidéo éducative

 

 

 

The Imperative Mood - L'Impératif.

8 minutes and 21 seconds, that's all !
Vidéo éducative

 

 

 

The conditional Mood in french

6 minutes and 52 seconds, that's all !
Vidéo éducative

 

 

 

Learn French subjunctive -
Part 1 

5 minutes and 1 second, that's all !
Vidéo éducative

 

 

 

Learn French subjunctive -
Part 2

6 minutes and 27 seconds, that's all !
Vidéo éducative

 

 

 

French Possessive Adjectives.

9 minutes and 1 second, that's all !
Vidéo éducative

 

 

 

Demonstrative Adjectives in French.

3 minutes and 16 seconds, that's all !
Vidéo éducative

 

 

 

Definite Article.

11 minutes and 57 seconds, that's all !
Vidéo éducative

 

 

 

De, Du, De la, Des in French : partitif or indefinite articles.

12 minutes and 45 seconds, that's all !
Vidéo éducative

 

 

 

French Verbs with Prepositions - Part I  (VERB + à).

8 minutes and 5 seconds, that's all !
Vidéo éducative

 

 

 

French Verbs with Prepositions - Part I  (VERB + de).

7 minutes and 21 seconds, that's all !
Vidéo éducative

 

 

 

French Pronouns : Object Pronouns (direct or indirect).

8 minutes and 59 seconds, that's all !
Vidéo éducative

 

 

 

Learn French - Pronouns Y and En - Les pronoms Y et EN.

9 minutes and 32 seconds, that's all !
Vidéo éducative

 

 

 

French Relative Pronouns Lequel, Dont.

9 minutes and 26 seconds, that's all !
Vidéo éducative

 

 

 

French Relative Pronouns Qui, Que in French.

8 minutes and 48 seconds, that's all !
Vidéo éducative

 

 

 

adjectives in French, French adjectives rules.

8 minutes and 26 seconds, that's all !
Vidéo éducative

 

 

 

The Superlative - How To Form The Superlative In French - Le superlatif.

13 minutes and 21 seconds, that's all !
Vidéo éducative

 

 

 

The Comparative - How To Make Comparisons In French - Le comparatif.

12 minutes and 30 seconds, that's all !
Vidéo éducative

 

 

 

Learn French - Adverbs - Les adverbes.

6 minutes and 55 seconds, that's all !
Vidéo éducative

 

 

 

Adverbs (part 2) - How To Form Adverbs In French - Les adverbes.

5 minutes and 26 seconds, that's all !
Vidéo éducative

 

 

 

Robin Williams - The French

1 minute and 31 seconds, that's all !
Vidéo éducative

 

 

 

Rien à signaler.

3 minutes et 20 secondes pour en savoir plus...
Vidéo éducative

 

 

 

Rien à signaler.

3 minutes et 20 secondes pour en savoir plus...
Vidéo éducative

 

 

 

Rien à signaler.

3 minutes et 20 secondes pour en savoir plus...
Vidéo éducative

 

 

 

Rien à signaler.

3 minutes et 20 secondes pour en savoir plus...
Vidéo éducative

 

 

 

Rien à signaler.

3 minutes et 20 secondes pour en savoir plus...

The sounds

Liaison

Adjectives

Pronouns

Adverbs

Articles

Sentence

Interrogative

Negative form

Passive form

Gender

Plural

The Auxiliaries

Verbs

Present tense

Progressive form

--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--

Additional...

Imperative

Near futur

Futur tense

Past tense

Les séquences du savoir des dossiers éducatifs   Accédez à plus de 500 dossiers éducatifs multimédias et interactifs... Chaque dossier est accompagné de vidéos, d'illustrations et d'articles pour vous aider à apprendre et comprendre : Sciences|Technologie|Terre & Espace|Société|Psychologie|Economie & Politique|Art|Littérature & Philo|Histoire & Géo|Nature|Médecine et Santé|Cinéma & TV|Loisir

 

 

 

 

Bon voyage !